Does Utorrent Give Viruses

Does Utorrent Give Viruses

uTorrent Continues to be Flagged as ‘Severe Threat’ and It’s …

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Popular BitTorrent client uTorrent is again being flagged as problematic by anti-virus vendors. This includes Microsoft’s Windows Defender, which simply removes the application from the operating system. According to reports, the software is categorized as ‘riskware, ‘ ‘malware, ‘ and ‘potentially unwanted software. ‘ In addition to uTorrent, rival client qBitTorrent is also facing similar problems.
Installed on dozens of millions of devices, uTorrent remains the go-to torrent client for people all around the world.
Research last year showed that roughly two-thirds of all BitTorrent users prefer it over the many available alternatives.
In 2018, the uTorrent team released a “Web” version of the software. For now, however, most users still prefer the standalone client. That is, if they manage to run it without anti-virus vendors getting in the way.
uTorrent Malicious?
Over the past few years, uTorrent has been repeatedly flagged as ‘malicious’ software. This issue flared up again recently and at the time of writing several anti-virus tools, including Windows Defender and Malwarebytes, label the torrent client as dangerous.
We ran the latest installer through a Virustotal scan which shows that uTorrent is flagged by 19 separate companies. The reasons differ from “riskware, ” through “cMine, ” to “bundled installer. ”
Microsoft, for example, categorizes uTorrent as a “Potentially Unwanted Application” (PUA). In fact, the company has had a dedicated uTorrent page in its malware database for years, labeling the software as a severe threat.
Potentially Unwanted Software
While the exact nature of the problem may vary, “potentially unwanted software” is a recurring theme. The term unwanted is broad can range from changing browser settings to installing third-party tools without permission. According to Microsoft, this is not the same as malware.
That doesn’t mean that the impact isn’t real. We have heard from several people who had uTorrent removed from their systems recently, and are unable to re-install it. Several of these complaints appear on social media as well, with people looking for advice.
qBitTorrent is Unwanted Too
Interestingly, uTorrent isn’t the only torrent client being flagged as potentially unwanted software. Earlier this month qBitTorrent was added to Microsoft’s malware database as well. While it’s not malware, but a PUA, Windows Defender actively blocks and removes the software.
This has resulted in numerous complaints on Reddit as well as the qBitTorrent GitHub page, with people sharing similar experiences.
“Windows Defender keeps silently removing the software despite being explicitly allowed on the machine, ” athelas64 writes. “After allowing the quarantined software, qBittorrent works…. until the next restart. ”
Another commenter wonders whether this is an organized action against torrent clients. This is not unlikely as many other torrent clients are being flagged as unwanted software as well. In fact, Microsoft itself suggests as much.
All Torrent Clients Are Unwanted?
In a background article on what’s considered unwanted software, torrent clients are specifically mentioned, along with advertising software and cryptominers. The article suggests that it applies to “enterprise” only, but the complaints we have seen apply to other Windows versions as well.
Microsoft’s article stresses that unwanted software isn’t the same as malware, but that isn’t mentioned in its own malware encyclopedia. Also, Windows Defender classifies PUAs as a ‘severe threat’.
When we ran uTorrent through the Virustotal scan many red flags appeared but qBitTorrent is pretty much clean. This suggests that Microsoft’s blocking could simply be due to the fact that it’s a torrent client, nothing else.
Although we do not recommend ignoring anti-virus warnings, there are ways to install uTorrent and qBitTorrent without running into trouble. One option is to disable the PUA protection in Windows, which can be done in a few clicks. Alternatively, users can simply switch to third-party anti-virus protection, which disables Windows Defender.
We have asked the uTorrent and qBitTorrent teams for a comment on our findings but, at the time of writing, they have yet to respond.
Microsoft informed TorrentFreak that torrent clients are indeed blocked as PUA’s on enterprise machines. However, there are other PUA criteria that may block the applications in other environments.
“We detect torrent applications for enterprise machines per our PUA criteria. Other criteria may trigger the detection of these applications on a consumer platform or the environment in which the detection is happening may be considered an enterprise environment, ” a Microsoft spokesperson informed us.
What is Torrenting? Is it Safe? Is it illegal? Will you be caught?

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What is Torrenting? Is it Safe? Is it illegal? Will you be caught?

Looking to find out more about torrenting? We explain exactly what torrenting is, how to torrent safely, and what to do if you get caught.
@pabischoff UPDATED: April 8, 2021
Three questions I’m often asked are: Is torrenting safe, is torrenting legal, and what happens if I get caught? This post answers those questions and looks at the methods torrenters use to stay safe and anonymous.
What is Torrenting?
Torrenting is the act of downloading and uploading files through the BitTorrent network. Instead of downloading files to a central server, torrenting involves downloading files from other users’ devices on the network. Conversely, users upload files from their own devices for other users to download.
Torrenting is the most popular form of peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing, and it requires torrent management software to connect to the BitTorrent network. Such software can be downloaded for free for a number of different devices.
Everyone downloading or uploading the same file is called a peer, and collectively they are known as a swarm. Because of how BitTorrent works, a peer can download a file from several other users at once, or upload a file to multiple other users simultaneously.
Torrenting is often associated with piracy because it’s frequently used to share files that are protected by copyright, including movies, games, music, and software. However, torrenting has many legitimate uses as well, such as lessening the load on centralized servers by distributing the hosting burden among users.
Torrenting safety and legality: In short
Is torrenting legal or illegal? Torrenting itself isn’t illegal, but downloading unsanctioned copyrighted material is. It’s not always immediately apparent which content is legal to torrent and which isn’t. Some fall in a gray area, so you may find yourself unwittingly on the wrong side of the law.
Your internet service provider (ISP) and copyright trolls monitoring the BitTorrent network can take action if they catch you illegally torrenting. This can range from a warning letter and throttling (slowing down) of your internet connection speeds to legal action – although the latter is increasingly rare.
Digital privacy-conscious torrenters will use VPN services, or virtual private networks, to keep their internet activity hidden from their ISP. With a wide range of applications, some VPNs are better suited for torrenting than others. If you want to keep your ISP from snooping on your activity, choose a VPN connection that: a) doesn’t keep a log of your activity, b) isn’t based in a country where the legal system can be used to demand customer records, and c) is fast enough that it won’t slow entire downloads. We’ve rounded up the providers that fit these criteria and others in our list of the best torrenting VPN services.
How to torrent safely
It is relatively simple to torrent safely and keep your online activity private. Note that while a VPN for torrenting will keep your activity private and safe from prying eyes you may still be susceptible to malware from some public torrent sites. Follow these 5 steps to torrent privately with a VPN.
Here’s how to torrent safely:
Download and install a VPN matching the criteria mentioned above. We recommend NordVPN.
Enable your VPN’s kill switch, if it has one.
Connect to a VPN server, preferably in a P2P-friendly country
Once the connection is established, open your torrent client and start downloading as usual
Your online activity is now encrypted by your VPN
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Torrenting without a VPN
Torrenting without a VPN means your internet service provider (ISP) can see your online activity including the sites you visit and the content you view. In certain countries, including the US, ISPs are allowed to share this information with third parties including intellectual property owners. A VPN will keep your online activity private from your ISP.
Is uTorrent safe?
uTorrent is the official torrent client from the creators of the BitTorrent protocol. It is proprietary—not open source—software maintained by a legal US company. Like BitTorrent, the uTorrent software itself is legal, although it can be used for digital piracy. The official uTorrent is free of malware and can be used safely and privately in combination with a VPN. It does not, however, prevent users from downloading malicious files that can infect their device.
In detail
The BitTorrent protocol rose to become the most popular medium for peer-to-peer file sharing in the world after the demise of centralized services like Napster and Limewire. Unlike those services, torrenting is almost completely decentralized save for the trackers that allow users to search and download torrent files and magnet links. Torrent files and magnet links are used to find other users on the network who host the desired file or files but do not actually host those files for downloading.
Is BitTorrent safe and legal?
The BitTorrent protocol is not in itself illegal or unsafe. It is just the means to share any type of file, and plenty of legal torrenting services do exist. The most popular torrent trackers, such as ThePirateBay and KickassTorrents, however, operate in a legal grey area, offering users free access to copyrighted content. Sharing and downloading copyrighted content by BitTorrent, or other means, is illegal in many countries and can be unsafe since sites including KickassTorrents have been shown to host malware.
These trackers would argue that they simply find and organize information that is already out there, and they do not illegally host any copyrighted content on their own servers. Just like the BitTorrent protocol itself, they are the means to an end. Not everyone is convinced. Major trackers have come under heavy legal scrutiny from content creators and distributors who argue the trackers enable and encourage theft.
The blame ultimately shifts to the users, the millions of individuals who host files on their personal computers, downloading and uploading movies, games, software, music, ebooks, and more. Users connected to the same tracker are called peers, and they fall into two categories. A leech uses a torrent file or magnet link to download the file from other users on the network who already have the file. These users who already have the file are called seeds. When a leech is finished downloading a file (or even just part of a file), he or she becomes a seed, allowing other leeches to download the file from his or her computer. As a general rule, it’s considered proper pirate etiquette to seed as much as you leech.
Comparitech does not condone or encourage any violation of copyright law or restrictions. Please consider the law, victims, and risks of copyright piracy before downloading copyrighted material without permission.
Legally speaking, seeding and leeching copyrighted material fall into different criminal categories. Think of it like buying illegal drugs: purchasing the drugs for personal use is definitely a crime, but a relatively minor one. Turning around and selling those drugs to others is a much more serious offense. Finding the original source of the drugs, or in this case the HD rip of the new Avengers movie, would be the best case scenario for law enforcement, but that isn’t always possible. The trackers act as the shady back alley marketplaces where all of these transactions go down, but they don’t personally handle any of the drugs.
What happens if you are caught torrenting?
The prosecution of torrent users has been sporadic. The chances of actually going to court or having to pay a settlement are pretty slim, but the penalties can be extremely high. The frequency of copyright holders suing torrenters for copyright infringement peaked in the late 2000s. Copyright pirates were sued for wildly disproportionate amounts of money, and most settled out of court.
These public scare tactics shone poorly on the recording and movie industries because they were portrayed as petty millionaires bullying poor college students. Direct lawsuits are much less common these days, but the campaign against torrenters is far from over.
Copyright trolls
Now the job of going after individual copyright pirates has been outsourced to a growing number of small businesses known as copyright trolls. These companies locate torrenters who illegally download copyrighted content through their real IP addresses. They then approach the copyright owners and sign a deal that lets them take legal action on their behalf. Others are hired directly by Hollywood production companies to sniff out pirates.
With legal leverage and a list of names, the copyright trolls then go after torrenters via mail, email, or even by going door to door and handing out settlement letters. These letters are not legally binding documents or injunctions. Copyright trolls use intimidation, fear, and shame to make torrenters pay without ever going to court. A common tactic is to threaten to sue for over $100, 000 but only ask for $3, 000 or so in the settlement. That makes the $3, 000 look like a good deal, but going to court is costly and risky for them, so don’t give in if you receive such a letter.
What to do if you receive a settlement letter
The most common way to receive a settlement letter is through your internet provider. A copyright troll will go through the court system to subpoena your ISP and force it to email customers with a legal threat and hand over personal details.
According to US law, an IP address is not a person. If you were contacted through your ISP, chances are that’s because the copyright troll doesn’t know your actual identity yet. If the letter doesn’t contain any identifying information on you, keep it that way and do nothing. Your case could be dismissed before the date that your ISP is set to reveal your personal details to the troll. If you respond and identify yourself, that gives the troll a more direct means of targeting you.
This is a game of probability for copyright trolls. If they send out 1, 000 threatening emails and 50 people reply, they only need a handful to actually cough up money to make it worth their time. Chances are it’s more cost effective for them to move on to the next swarm of torrenters than pursue the remaining 950 people.
If things escalate and you decide to take action, lawyer up. Here’s a list of attorneys compiled by the Electronic Frontier Foundation that specialize in these sorts of cases.
ISP penalties
Depending on your ISP, it may take actions against you on its own behalf. That could mean throttling your internet connection or threatening to hand over personal details to a copyright troll. Why does your ISP even care? Because torrenting takes up a lot of bandwidth, and that bandwidth costs ISPs money. On top of that, an ISP could be receiving kickbacks from content owners and their associates.
How to protect yourself
To avoid any legal ramifications, it’s best to simply not torrent. However, if you insist on torrenting, take the time to protect your online privacy and keep copyright trolls at bay.
Use a VPN when torrenting
The best way to torrent safely is by using a VPN. A VPN accomplishes two things: first, it re-routes all your internet traffic through a server in a location of your choosing, which changes your real IP address to one used by hundreds or thousands of other people (assuming your VPN uses shared IP addresses, which most do). This adds a significant layer of anonymity and makes it much more difficult for anyone to track you. Second, a VPN encrypts all your torrent traffic before it leaves your computer. That means your ISP cannot monitor your internet activity, nor can anyone else. And because all your traffic heads to the VPN server first, ISPs can’t even tell where it’s going.
Using a quality VPN is key; don’t settle for a “free” service or VPNs that log your activity, cap your bandwidth and data, or don’t provide sufficient DNS leak protection. Not all VPNs tolerate torrenting. You can check out our list of the best VPNs for torrenting here, which are services with fast download speeds and a focus on online privacy, security and anonymity like NordVPN, Surfshark, and ExpressVPN among others.
Other alternatives
If you don’t want to pay for a VPN, you might be considering Tor. Tor is similar to a VPN in that it routes your traffic through several volunteer “nodes” while encrypting traffic. We recommend a VPN over Tor for a couple reasons. First, Tor is slow, and usually best for simple browsing and other low-bandwidth activity. Second, connecting to Tor could actually draw more attention from your ISP and law enforcement, as it’s a well-known tool for hackers and criminals.
Another popular app among torrenters is Peerblock. Peerblock is a desktop firewall with a regularly updated blacklist of IP addresses. These IP addresses belong to entities that try to track your activity online, especially on peer-to-peer networks. Unfortunately, the blacklist is only updated once upon installation. After that, users must pay to keep them updated. Even if you’re willing to pay, it’s unlikely that the blacklist could contain every possible IP address for copyright trolls, universities, and law enforcement. A copyright troll just needs to connect to the swarm–all the devices connected to a single torrent–with an IP that isn’t on that blacklist to get your IP address.
Usenet
Instead of torrenting, another alternative is Usenet. Usenet is a paid service-usually between $10 and $20 per month–where you download files from centralized servers instead of a network of peers. Usenet downloads are much, much faster; often as fast as your ISP can handle. Usenet is more private as well. The connections take place between you and the provider’s network of servers, and the best providers offer an SSL-encrypted connection. Some even throw in VPNs for good measure. Torrents, on the other hand, require that you share at least some identifying information to connect to the tracker and peers.
Finally, downloading a Usenet file doesn’t mean you have to seed it for other internet users afterward. Legally, this makes you less of a target because you’re not supplying strangers with copyrighted content, at the same time consuming fewer computer resources and internet bandwidth.
Usenet providers make files available for a certain number of days. How many depends on the provider, but the standard is 1, 200 days after the original posting. Until that time is up, users have full access to that file. Torrents only stay up as long as people seed the file.
We’ve rounded up some of the best Usenet providers here.
Public vs private trackers
A “tracker” is like a search engine that indexes files on the BitTorrent network. Trackers can be private or public, and the former usually requires an invitation from an existing member.
ThePirateBay, KickassTorrents, and Demonoid are all examples of public trackers. Anyone can just go to their respective websites and search without logging in or requiring any sort of authentication. Likewise, anyone can upload files for others to download. These uploads are not moderated, so users must judge whether a download is safe and accurate based on comments and the reputation of the uploader.
Private trackers are more exclusive both in terms of who can upload and who can download within a group. They vary wildly in terms of content and quality, but many members of private trackers attest that they have higher quality files, faster downloads, longer retention, and an overall more consistent and safe experience.
The law views private trackers the same as public trackers. Internet piracy is piracy whether you do it in public or within a private group.
Streaming vs torrenting
Many people have moved away from downloading entire files through BitTorrent and opt instead to stream video content either on their web browsers or through customized programs like Kodi. When it comes to safety and the law, what’s the difference?
Legally speaking, you’re probably still breaking the law when you stream illegal content from a pirated source. However, this depends largely on your country. In the UK, it’s outright illegal. In India, a court ruled that it is absolutely not illegal. In the US, it’s still a grey area, as there’s been no precedent of anyone being convicted for copyright piracy after streaming copyrighted video content from an unsanctioned source.
Those who upload the videos without compensating or asking permission from the copyright holder do so illegally. That’s pretty much standard no matter where you are.
Not only do laws tend to be more lenient toward streaming content, but it’s also more difficult for copyright trolls and law enforcement to catch users in the act. When you download a torrent, you can see the IP addresses of everyone else you’re uploading to or downloading from. But streaming transmits a video directly from a website to your device, with no third parties involved.
Don’t get too comfortable, however, as there are still risks. The website could be logging IP addresses or other information about its users, which it could then hand over to law enforcement or a copyright troll. Your ISP could monitor your activity and see that you are watching pirated content. These are risks that can be mitigated by connecting to a reputable VPN.
When it comes to security, streaming video carries just as many risks as torrenting. Websites that stream pirated content tend to be chock full of intrusive ads, malware, and phishing threats. Kodi users are subject to man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks and other threats from the add-ons they download.
More tips
As a rule of thumb, avoid downloading movies that were released on DVD and Blu-Ray in the past 60 days, especially big-hit blockbusters. That’s when movies make the vast majority of their post-box office money, after which their income significantly drops off. Copyright holders will put most of their anti-piracy resources into going after torrenters of new releases to minimize the financial damage. The same goes for TV series, shows and video games.
Users of Popcorn Time, the free movie-streaming app, should tread just as carefully as torrenters. Many Popcorn Time users don’t realize that the app actually streams directly from torrents and will even seed a file so it is uploaded to other users. All the risks associated with Popcorn Time apply in equal measure to torrenting.
Choose your torrents wisely. The most popular torrents on ThePirateBay and KickassTorrents are probably the ones being most closely monitored by copyright trolls. However, don’t pick totally unpopular ones either. Read through the comments section, where users often run virus scans on torrent downloads and post the results. They will also give you a general review of the quality.
Even if the comments are positive, run your own virus scans as well. Ideally, use multiple antivirus programs to run an array of scans, as each of their virus libraries can differ. Not all antivirus programs play nice with each other, however, so mixing two or more must be done with care. We recommend Bitdefender to scan all downloads before opening. This is especially important when downloading games and software, which are often “cracked” by the uploader. Cracks make it easier to bypass DRM schemes that validate content with the publisher, but they also make it easier to distribute hidden malware, spyware, and viruses. Check out Comparitech’s antivirus reviews section here.
Torrenting FAQ
Why did BitTorrent install adware on my computer? BitTorrent is a network and protocol used to share files, so BitTorrent itself cannot install adware on your computer.
However, the programs used to connect to the BitTorrent network and download files, called torrent managers or torrent clients, can and often do come with adware. The files you download can also contain malware and adware.
Stick to reputable torrent managers and, if prompted, refuse any offers to install additional software alongside them. These additional programs are often adware.
Likewise, be sure to only download and upload torrents you downloading a shared torrent from Google drive illegal? If you’re downloading something from Google Drive, then it’s not a torrent. It’s just a download. The file might have originally been downloaded through BitTorrent, then uploaded to Google Drive where others can download it.
Semantics aside, if the content of the file is protected by copyright, then yes, it is illegal to download pirated files from Google I just download a torrent from a public place? Most torrenters use public trackers to find and download files through BitTorrent. So in that sense, yes, you can download a torrent from a public place provided you have a torrent client installed on your device.
The files themselves are downloaded from other BitTorrent users who have downloaded the file and are now uploading it to fellow users.
Private trackers are also available and are often safer, but typically require an invitation from an existing I go to jail for torrenting? It depends on the circumstances, but no, it’s highly doubtful you would go to jail for torrenting. Most lawsuits regarding torrenting are civil suits, not criminal ones, so if a penalty is levied, it’s usually a fine or some other monetary compensation.
That being said, it also depends on what country you’re in, what you torrent, and whether you also seeded the file so it could be downloaded by other users. Check your local laws and are the risks of torrenting music? The music recording industry has, on occasion, aggressively targeted torrenters who engaged in music piracy. These days, litigation is mostly done by copyright trolls who target torrenters on behalf of recording studios. They’ll send out settlement letters demanding hundreds or even thousands of dollars to torrenters whom they can identify. They usually go through internet service providers to contact torrenters. Your ISP could throw you under the bus, and that’s not a gamble we recommend taking. By using a VPN, you can greatly reduce the risk of being identified by a copyright troll.
How to Remove “UTORRENT.EXE” - Comodo File Intelligence

How to Remove “UTORRENT.EXE” – Comodo File Intelligence

First Seen: 11 October 2011 at 8:24 am
No.
Company
File Type
SHA1
MD5
MalwareName
DigitallySigned
FileVersion
ProductVersion
SubmittedFrom
Malware Behavior
1
BitTorrent Inc.
Executable
5f53b2c236f476234d27f90b1ff73764ea053a23
a198a94bfb48977896735bceba8e1718
No
3. 5. 45852
5. 228. 2. 62/32
N/A
2
c01cf1abe53eb8980c5284fbcdf18d16331e1484
f33961ca3d77fd9c18c3ff695a10d4e2
Russian Federation
3
92b429851b422a064b69300ab79bb35edb481099
73b63fe94b400fcec5ef9e9778bd3156
3. 4. 35702
Pakistan
4
13d3acbd4df67617911734f0ff3d558b3592c367
7928d49ee6573ed47892d959c653fba8
Yes
3. 3. 44428
United States
5
ef38c6b8d9ff425bfeed37986a2a1ad782bcd57b
f4387d8ceebe4b29b04f089f97abff4e
3. 44846
103. 120. 6. 178/32
6
bccc4f7ec7257744743f71f073e981f87528f5f3
480120e9f008ae839a31988f0aab3c71
7
d75bad8e75e653d8ea4d92e0dbc37e9021e2346b
2b5e967d1989d3c27d7e95d0dc46cb9d
8
dfb45cdcc2089c9b2e094a75ca61d736b4cb6a06
598a32a737aad71ac59ab19e8fdbb88d
nonce. ~v001
3. 45271
9
c129340491ed1933cd20ffee2d358e2dc6f76f82
7629e92f2a2d1ba1f8154ddf3d915225
Ukraine
10
2da09c782ff7751c5acf73d1b8910d21c65fef4f
2e93154452ca14151bf4f81fa71fb12a
11
BitTorrent, Inc.
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055379bb1e60b59b6198d0fa42b2239a
1. 8. 15772
12
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580ed31238f7d59ac2ac09a003b0a90b
3. 46038
13
480a26f23d77aa7e4abab0839b417f1d8f8544a8
2647762616abe33b73b19fdf2227b959
197. 210. 17/32
14
2c376d824e73d425c4f3b96a9c6dfeca61c645fb
a351ec6851c53cf52bb3ad15dbd27502
1. 00
15
fb9e5df9f28211d5d9800f968e5c2ca96d32e52a
bf1dcc88153d850148db874e1e152e0e
2. 0. 17668
Brazil
16
673d9abdb9619485f139ffc3675c9b81037e6c11
0ccc0eaed971337f87cfbefcbf7efc83
3. 28407
Algeria
17
5a9479c41114179d2ce63b631d30dd01cd9740ab
7354d75c68d2f91ad1ce8906e6c01448
2. 1. 25302
18
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19
3d95555be775d9525358666b681fef56b9ea7355
7020ee6de78307ce602b64c715ef8d7e
31. 132. 208. 96/32
20
Windows
41d0c2916d5f2e1a92ab57a500c817241035d1de
6805b18b1e44bf3b56d8fa7ddb881a9a
1. 09. 0005
197. 77. 180/32
21
bf5c737bb032c78c27c11dd42bb8e4179cddab3d
7d3b2dde3bf0643a1d55100ff648a18d
India
22
bbee05be276e43c249573f08a502ebc4d912281b
0bf3cf1a2cacf0cbbd70a21776c0f321
3. 45828
23
8d7ffdaf015a74fa9b996c7e591ac1b97180fdf3
47fe30c296c60497547ddf2662385628
24
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2. 21586
25
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26
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27
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3. 45776
28
2f2dc42c3ce2de4e2df595928b7eb8c43df265b3
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3. 26473
29
9a7cfbf41b8a85b3acfad52720a4c05e47cbc504
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3. 44396
30
1cbcd339cdb455203582dbb01006bbfa23ab475e
f460ebb5896d5abf45896f73d8721409
France
31
4f459987156cb0c54cc78808d1a1c063b1137ca6
4352029ec797f7759e707cc4ce981a93
3. 44332
37. 111. 248. 142/32
32
53bdc6b4dd4f96e49c6daea1fe42bd0e5b4f7902
fda4a7166d818cad23c4e02285159962
Romania
33
704a5c1ab1a74a9969ae340d6198b572dba5a1e3
b1167499fadeb6bd38863dcdb9bb2ea9
3. 7. 42330
154. 160. 24. 175/32
34
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35
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Poland
36
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37
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3. 45449
38
0bb486f20a9aa3317ff98c4f7794a70b30369b34
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3. 26593
Bulgaria
39
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1. 3593
Indonesia
40
2809455d5d029536a50d9dbe319d892e07fe2c27
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41
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42
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3. 46074
Philippines
43
3b5a94409ca710729780f7e56ec28b2c7864577c
0b982fbd846a067de897ad63033d6feb
44
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45
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1. 17414
Turkey
46
0b3e19c612f32c0ada51d7b1f4404249f7d6f7ac
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47
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48
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UnclassifiedMalware
United Kingdom
49
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50
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1. 12639
51
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2. 25130
52
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3. 45988
53
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54
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3. 25756
55
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3. 45790
56
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ApplicUnwnt
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Frequently Asked Questions about does utorrent give viruses

Are uTorrent files safe?

Is uTorrent safe? uTorrent is the official torrent client from the creators of the BitTorrent protocol. … The official uTorrent is free of malware and can be used safely and privately in combination with a VPN. It does not, however, prevent users from downloading malicious files that can infect their device.Apr 8, 2021

Is uTorrent exe a virus?

uTorrent.exe is a legitimate process file popularly known as µTorrent. It is associated with µTorrent applicatoin developed by BitTorrent. … Malware programmers write virus files with malicious scripts and save them as uTorrent.exe with an intention to spread virus on the internet.

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