What Is A Private Ip

What Is A Private Ip

What is a Private IP Address? – WhatIs.com

What is a private IP address?
A private IP address is a range of non-internet facing IP addresses used in an internal network. Private IP addresses are provided by network devices, such as routers, using network address translation.
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses identify a device on either the internet or a local network. IP addresses also enable information to be sent between devices on a network.
Private IP addresses are commonly used for local area networks in residential, office and enterprise areas. Every device that connects to an internet network — such as computers, smartphones, tablets or printers — will have a private IP address. Routers need a way to identify these devices, and the devices may also need to identify each other, which is where private IP addresses come in. Private IP addresses are generated by a router for identification.
Private IP addresses were originally designated to delay the exhaustion of IPv4 addresses — one of the main types of IP addresses. Originally it was thought that IPv4’s 32-bit IP addressing system — with 4, 294, 967, 296 theoretical IP addresses — would be adequate for all purposes. But as more internet-connected devices were produced, it became apparent that something had to fill the gap between IPv4 and a future system. Private IP addressing and network address translation began filling that initial gap with a range of private IP addresses. Later, a new addressing system, Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6), was introduced. IPv6 increases IP address lengths from 32 bits to 128 bits and is 1, 028 times larger than the number of IPv4 addresses.
Private addresses can be assigned by the router using the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol or be manually set, after which the addresses can communicate with one another through the router.
What is a private IP address used for?
Private IP addresses are commonly used for residential and corporate networks, as the addresses cannot be seen outside the private network. Internet service providers (ISPs) may also allocate a single routable IPv4 address to residential customers. To translate that one address to multiple addresses, so multiple devices can have the assigned address, a network address translator/port address translator gateway is used. This method can connect multiple hosts.
Corporate networks use private IP addresses for security, since they make it difficult for an external host to connect to a system. Organizations also use private IP addresses to restrict internet access to internal users, which helps increase security.
How can you check your private IP address?
Most individuals do not need to know their IP address, but in some scenarios the knowledge comes in handy, such as when connecting a computer to another device on the network.
The steps for finding a device’s IP address differ by platform.
Windows. Search for cmd in the Windows search bar, then in the command line prompt, type ipconfig to view the private IP address.
Mac. Select system preferences, then click on network to view the private IP address.
iPhone. Select settings. Go to Wi-Fi, tap the i that appears next to the network it is connected on, and the IP address will display under the DHCP tab.
Android. Select Settings, go to About, tap on Status and the IP address should be visible.
Other devices can be checked from the connected router. The steps to do this will differ by router, however.
What are the different private IP address ranges?
Private IP addressing uses both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.
Private IPv4 addresses have the following class configurations:
Class A IP addresses. Configurations range from 10. 0. 0 to 10. 255. This class is for large networks and has 8 bits for the network and 24 bits for hosts.
Class B IP addresses. Configurations range from 172. 16. 0 to 172. 31. This class is for medium networks and has 16 bits for the network and 16 bits for hosts.
Class C IP addresses. Configurations range from 192. 168. 0 to 192. This class is for smaller networks and has 24 bits for the network and 8 bits for hosts.
The range of private IP addresses seems relatively small because they can be reused on different private networks without consequence. This differs from public IP addresses, which all need to be uniquely identifiable.
This image shows an example of an IPv6 address and its makeup.
IPv6 private address ranges include the following:
fc00::/7 address block. These are reserved IP addresses from the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority for unique local addresses.
fec0::/10 address block. These are for deprecating site local addresses.
IPv6 addresses are written in hexadecimal, which uses four bits, meaning an IPv6 address is made up of 32 hexadecimal digits. The numbers are grouped in fours, with a total of eight blocks, or groups.
What are the differences between a private and public IP address?
Both public and private IP addresses have attributes indicative of their roles. For example, differences between public and private IP addresses include how private IP addresses are used for communicating within a private network, or with other devices in a home network or office. They cannot be directly contacted over the internet. Meanwhile, public IP addresses are used to communicate over the public internet, outside a private network. Public IP addresses are unique and cannot be reused unlike private IP addresses, which can be reused. Private IP addresses are assigned to a device by a router within the network, while an ISP assigns public IP addresses. In addition, public IP addresses can be any combination of numbers that do not fall within private IP address ranges.
This table shows the differences between private and public IP addresses.
Private IP addresses also have an extra layer of security because they are only located within private networks, and not to the internet as a public IP address would be.
Learn the differences between IPv4 and IPv6, and how many addresses IPv6 supports.
This was last updated in July 2021
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Public vs. Private IP Addresses: What's the Difference? - Avast

Public vs. Private IP Addresses: What’s the Difference? – Avast

Before we jump into what makes an IP address public or private, let’s discuss what an IP address is in general. Each device connected to the internet has a unique numerical identifier assigned to it — an IP address. IP addresses are how devices and websites communicate with one another, and how the information you’re looking for knows where to find you.
In this article, we’ll deep-dive into the specifics of public and private IP addresses, including how they’re assigned, what their ranges mean, important differences between them, and how you can set up a VPN to secure your IP address and protect your identity.
What is a public IP address?
A public IP address is an IP address that can be accessed directly over the internet and is assigned to your network router by your internet service provider (ISP). Your personal device also has a private IP that remains hidden when you connect to the internet through your router’s public IP.
Using a public IP address to connect to the internet is like using a P. O. box for your snail mail, rather than giving out your home address. It’s a little bit safer, but a lot more visible.
How does a public IP address differ from an external IP address?
The terms public IP address and external IP address are essentially interchangeable. No matter which phrasing you prefer, the function is the same: a public (or external) IP address helps you connect to the internet from inside your network, to outside your network.
Are public IP addresses traceable?
Yes. Public IP addresses can be traced back to your ISP, which can potentially reveal your general geographical location. When advertisers, governments, or hackers know where you’re connecting from, it’s easier for them to follow what you do online.
Websites also use IP tracking to analyze online behavior patterns, making it easier for them to determine if the same individual visits the site repeatedly. Websites can then use these patterns to predict your preferences.
To browse the internet more anonymously, you can hide your IP address by connecting through a security protocol: a proxy server, a VPN, or the Tor browser. You can also try your luck with private browsers, but most of them don’t provide the kind of disguise your IP address needs.
These days, the quickest way to ensure your IP address is safely hidden online is to connect with a VPN. Avast SecureLine VPN will encrypt your connection automatically — keeping your web surfing private, your online banking secure, and your preferences to yourself.
What is a private IP address?
A private IP address is the address your network router assigns to your device. Each device within the same network is assigned a unique private IP address (sometimes called a private network address) — this is how devices on the same internal network talk to each other.
Private IP addresses let devices connected to the same network communicate with one another without connecting to the entire internet. By making it more difficult for an external host or user to establish a connection, private IPs help bolster security within a specific network, like in your home or office. This is why you can print documents via wireless connection to your printer at home, but your neighbor can’t send their files to your printer accidentally.
Local IP addresses are also how your router directs internet traffic internally — in other words, how your router returns search results to your computer rather than another device connected to your network (like your phone or your partner’s phone).
Private vs. local vs. internal IP addresses
Similar to how public IP address and external IP address are interchangeable terms, private IP address and internal IP address are interchangeable terms as well. A private IP address is also often called a local IP address — it’s up to you which term you use.
Are private IP addresses traceable?
Yes, private IP addresses are traceable, but only by other devices on your local network. Each device connected to your local network has a private IP address, and each device’s private IP address can be seen only by other devices within that network. But unlike the public IP address that your router uses to connect your device to the internet, your private IP address cannot be seen online.
Key differences between public and private IP addresses
The main difference between public and private IP addresses is how far they reach, and what they’re connected to. A public IP address identifies you to the wider internet so that all the information you’re searching for can find you. A private IP address is used within a private network to connect securely to other devices within that same network.
Each device within the same network has a unique private IP address.
Public and private IP address ranges
Your private IP address exists within specific private IP address ranges reserved by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and should never appear on the internet. There are millions of private networks across the globe, all of which include devices assigned private IP addresses within these ranges:
Class A: 10. 0. 0 — 10. 255. 255
Class B: 172. 16. 0 — 172. 31. 255
Class C: 192. 168. 0 — 192. 255
These might not seem like wide ranges, but they don’t really need to be. Because these IP addresses are reserved for private network use only, they can be reused on different private networks all over the world — without consequence or confusion.
And don’t be surprised if you have a device or two at home with a so-called 192 IP address, or a private IP address beginning with 192. This is the most common default private IP address format assigned to network routers around the globe.
Unsurprisingly, the public IP address range encompasses every number not reserved for the private IP range. Since a public IP address is a unique identifier for each device connected to the internet, it needs to be just that: unique.
Summarizing the differences between private and public IP addresses
Public IP address
Private IP address
External (global) reach
Internal (local) reach
Used for communicating outside your private network, over the internet
Used for communicating within your private network, with other devices in your home or office
A unique numeric code never reused by other devices
A non-unique numeric code that may be reused by other devices in other private networks
Found by Googling: “What is my IP address? ”
Found via your device’s internal settings
Assigned and controlled by your internet service provider
Assigned to your specific device within a private network
Not free
Free
Any number not included in the reserved private IP address range
Example: 8. 8. 8.
10. 255;172. 255; 192. 255
Example: 10. 11. 12. 13
How can I check which type of IP address I’m using?
When you connect to the internet, your private IP address is replaced with your ISP-assigned public IP address. This protects your private IP and other devices in your network, while also ensuring you can still connect online. Both types of IP addresses are important for your device’s connection to the outside world — but how do you find them?
The easiest way to find your public IP address is to Google: “What is my IP address? ” Depending on your ISP, you might see both an IPv4 and IPv6 address listed due to the increasing use of IPv6 addresses over IPv4. You can find your private IP address on Windows or macOS with a few quick clicks.
As you learn about private and public IP addresses, remember that they may change. If your ISP assigns you a dynamic IP address vs. a static IP address, for example, you might be subject to more network outages or connectivity issues in the long run.
And if you need to use a VPN to connect to the internet, your public IP address will change each time you connect — each new connection is encrypted to hide your IP address and keep prying eyes away.
A VPN encrypts your public IP address for better security and privacy online.
Keep your IP address truly under wraps with Avast SecureLine VPN
At the end of the day, the reason your public IP address works for you is the same reason it may work against you: it’s completely visible online. The best way to protect your real IP address is to use a VPN, which routes all your online traffic through a separate server nowhere near your actual location.
Connect via VPN to keep your IP address hidden, encrypt your connection, or even to bypass geolocation restrictions to access your favorite content online. No matter what you use it for, you can be sure that Avast SecureLine VPN will disguise your real IP address — while keeping your entire connection secure and lightning-fast.
IPv4 Private Address Space and Filtering - ARIN

IPv4 Private Address Space and Filtering – ARIN

According to standards set forth in Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) document RFC-1918, the following IPv4 address ranges are reserved by the IANA for private internets, and are not publicly routable on the global internet:
10. 0. 0/8 IP addresses: 10. 0 – 10. 255. 255
172. 16. 0/12 IP addresses: 172. 0 – 172. 31. 255
192. 168. 0/16 IP addresses: 192. 0 – 192. 255
Note that only a portion of the “172” and the “192” address ranges are designated for private use. The remaining addresses are considered “public, ” and thus are routable on the global Internet.
Use caution when setting filters to exclude these private address ranges. In some cases, Regional Internet Registries (RIRs) have issued adjacent address space to their customers and that space is in use on the global Internet.
In August 2012, ARIN began allocating “172” address space to internet service, wireless, and content providers. There have been reports from the community that many network operators are denying access to devices having IP addresses from within the entire 172 /8 range. As a result, any device with a 172. x. x IP address may have difficulty reaching some sites on the global Internet. The only way to solve this problem is for those operators to reconfigure their routers or firewall access controls and filter only address space from the 172. 0/12 range.

Frequently Asked Questions about what is a private ip

What is Private IP and why is it used?

A private IP address is a range of non-internet facing IP addresses used in an internal network. … IP addresses also enable information to be sent between devices on a network. Private IP addresses are commonly used for local area networks in residential, office and enterprise areas.

What is meant a private IP address?

What is a private IP address? A private IP address is the address your network router assigns to your device. Each device within the same network is assigned a unique private IP address (sometimes called a private network address) — this is how devices on the same internal network talk to each other.Apr 22, 2021

Is 192.168 a private IP?

192.168. Note that only a portion of the “172” and the “192” address ranges are designated for private use. The remaining addresses are considered “public,” and thus are routable on the global Internet. Use caution when setting filters to exclude these private address ranges.

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